Maplewood History: Dinky Streetcar by Billy Jones, Followed by a Veritable Cornucopia of Maplewood Streetcar Photos

In Maplewood, we youngsters from Lyndover Elementary School once monthly took our tour on our “Dinky” streetcar. Where Lindbergh now meets Big Bend were streetcar tracks and a trolley wire over Big Bend. Big trucks did not drive on Big Bend. Our yellow “Dinky” streetcar stopped for us on the east side of Big Bend and our conductor manually took the fare box from the front to the back pole. He then engaged the rear trolley wire and tied down the front trolley wire.

Maplewood History: White Castle and Saratoga Lanes

By Bill Jones: White Castle was our only stop on the way to Saratoga Lanes.  The White Castle was located in the 7400 block of Manchester–about 40 feet west of Sutton.  Johnny Ryan’s Tavern was on the southwest corner of Sutton and Manchester and did NOT serve food.  The City of Maplewood wouldn’t license them to serve food. Their customers would take White Castles to Ryan’s and have them with their schooners of Falstaff.

Maplewood History: Yale Loop Fire

No one asked for this post. I ran one of these images in my previous post, “Night of the Cobras”.  I had a thought while looking at the Yale Loop Fire file that my blog followers would probably like to see these other images.  That day it was 104 degrees in Maplewood.  Perhaps that explains part of the appeal of these images to me.

Maplewood History: Night of the Cobras

A photograph sent by a reader, Michele, started me thinking about how we traded our original old streetlights for the modern (at the time) cobra heads.  Then how our taste flipped and we gratefully deep sixed the cobra heads only to replace them with guess what?  Faithful reproductions of the originals.  

Then I started to think about some of the really wonderful streetlights that I’ve seen in Europe and I wondered have they kept them all along?  If they have how is it that they’re smarter than us?

Resident finds1901 Maplewood license plate in backyard

A Maplewood resident on Marietta Avenue has been searching his yard with a metal detector, and recently found an old license tag and two quarters from the early 1900s. Greg Lappin found a 1901 Maplewood license tag and the quarters in a corner of his yard, where he said a “Model A garage” once stood. He said it can be seen in a 1955 aerial photograph, found on the St. Louis County website. The quarters are: a 1917 Standing Liberty Quarter, and a 1903 Barber Quarter, named after the department of treasury designer who designed it.

Maplewood History: Where The Clean Air Is—Maplewood!

By now Bill Jones should need no introduction.  He is very good at supplying me with these short sketches from his experiences here in Maplewood.  I’ve been less good at getting them posted.  I know you’ll enjoy this one titled:

Where The Clean Air Is–Maplewood! In 1934, we moved to Maplewood because mother had a lung condition (indicating possible TB).

Maplewood History: Photoshop in the Service of Historic Preservation

After I retired at the end of 2001, I helped some folks start the Maplewood Historical Society. One of our first projects was making enlargements of some of the historic photographs in our library’s collection and displaying them in a then empty storefront on Sutton. To save money we made the enlargements on Kinko’s copy machine.  Worked pretty good too. Some of the first old timers I talked to were Elmer Wind Jr. of EJ Tire (on and in the Wedge) and Alan Blood of the Maplewood Mill.

Woman shares Maplewood memories

Joan Carollo, who grew up in Maplewood, emailed some remembrances to 40 South. Her grandparents lived in a house that now borders the MRH Early Childhood Center, according to Google Maps. From Joan Carollo:

My grandparents lived on 2816 Burgess Avenue in Maplewood, and raised four children (my mom, one sister and two brothers). They owned a business on Manchester west of Laclede Station Road. My mom was born February 5, 1912.

Maplewood History: Live! This Thursday, the 15th at 6:30 at the Maplewood Public Library

Truth be told it’s me that’s live.  Maplewood History is, of course, being created constantly but just about everything I’m going to talk about happened a long time ago.  I have carefully selected about a hundred and ten digital images to present to you Thursday evening. As Dawn has mentioned all ripe fruit must be checked at the door.  I will be live and I want to stay that way so don’t bring any weapons either.

Maplewood History: Tales of the Harper’s Pharmacy by Bill Jones

These stories that Mr. Jones has been submitting are priceless.  I’m not sure whether I should refer to him as Bill, Will or Billy but no matter.  His stories let us understand past life in our community that we couldn’t possibly imagine otherwise.  I’m sure you’ll enjoy his latest called:

My Lesson in Growing Up

February 5, 1939–My sister said,  It’s Mr. Harper calling for Billy.”  Mr. Harper asked me, “Will you be twelve tomorrow?

Maplewood History: The Magnificent Cabinetry of the Harper’s Pharmacy… While We’re on the Subject

April 17, 2017, the New York Times, page A4.  That is the location of a disturbing article by Alissa Rubin titled, “As Village Homes Are Stripped Bare, French History Vanishes.”  Ms. Rubin then goes on to describe how speculators and sometimes owners are stripping many of France’s historic buildings of their “architectural treasures and sell(ing) them, often abroad, leaving once graceful historic structures little more than empty shells behind gaily painted facades.”

Just what exactly are these defilers of French history making off with? The NYT’s article lists “antique tile floors, wood paneling, mantelpieces and chimneys and sometimes even …staircases.” It also mentions floorboards, wooden window frames and doors. Many of these items wind up in expensive homes in Germany, the United States, Japan and some are bought by foreigners for their vacation homes in the south of France. A terra cotta tile floor for a kitchen might be worth $6,500, a mantelpiece, as much as $10,000, and an antique oak door, $600.