Maplewood History: Historic Transportation Photograph Available Tonight!

It is hard to believe that a year has passed since the last Dinner Auction & Awards Ceremony given by our Chamber of Commerce. 

As most of you know the Maplewood Chamber and the Richmond Heights Chamber have merged.  They’re now the Mid County Chamber and they have put together an event that promises to be a lot of fun. They’re calling it their Superstition Ball since it’s happening on Friday the 13th. They have a very large number of really “hip” items that you can bid on and by buying know you are supporting an organization that helps our community.  It’s a great way to give something back. As has been my habit for the last eight or so years (truly I don’t know how long I’ve been doing this) I have created a composite photo from my digital archive.  The theme this year is transportation in historic Maplewood.  Once again the wonderful folks at Frame of Mind picture framing have agreed to enhance my photograph with their top notch skills at their art.  And their practice definitely is an art.  Just take a look at how Mark’s skill put the finishing touch to this donation of ours to the chamber’s auction. These guys at Frame of Mind are good.  The professionals use them and they know a good frame can make or break a photo, painting, map or what-have-you.  You should use them too.  They’re at 2900 South Big Bend in our fair city.  Their phone number is 314-644-4466.  And they are in an historic building!  The Parison Bakery.

Maplewood History: 4 Buildings, 3 City Halls and 1 Case of Mistaken Identity

If I had a nickel for every time someone asked me about our first city hall at the NW corner of Hazel and Sutton, I would probably have 20 or maybe 25 cents by now.  7401 Hazel is a lovely building and one of our oldest commercial ones but it was never our city hall. It was put up in 1898 by Dr. Cape who lived across the street.  To refresh your memory you might like to take a look at this previous post. Cape, Koester and our First City Hall

We are currently using city hall building #3.  I have sifted through my digital archive for what information I can find to answer any questions you may have about our city halls once and for all.  Or at least for a year or so until everyone including me has completely forgotten the contents of this post. To sum it all up, we used city hall #1 for 14 years, city hall #2 for 40 and city hall #3 for 53 and counting.

Maplewood History: What Was In That Building On The Corner?

A couple of weeks ago I got an email from reader Meredith.  She said, “I am looking for some historical information on a building. I’m a big fan of the historic Maplewood blog posts and I’m curious about the building at 7376 Manchester, on the SE corner of Manchester and Sutton. Do you have any information on its original purpose or other history of the building throughout the years? Meredith, I do and here it is.

Maplewood History: Dinky Streetcar by Billy Jones, Followed by a Veritable Cornucopia of Maplewood Streetcar Photos

In Maplewood, we youngsters from Lyndover Elementary School once monthly took our tour on our “Dinky” streetcar. Where Lindbergh now meets Big Bend were streetcar tracks and a trolley wire over Big Bend. Big trucks did not drive on Big Bend. Our yellow “Dinky” streetcar stopped for us on the east side of Big Bend and our conductor manually took the fare box from the front to the back pole. He then engaged the rear trolley wire and tied down the front trolley wire.

Maplewood History: Yale Loop Fire

No one asked for this post. I ran one of these images in my previous post, “Night of the Cobras”.  I had a thought while looking at the Yale Loop Fire file that my blog followers would probably like to see these other images.  That day it was 104 degrees in Maplewood.  Perhaps that explains part of the appeal of these images to me.

Maplewood History: Night of the Cobras

A photograph sent by a reader, Michele, started me thinking about how we traded our original old streetlights for the modern (at the time) cobra heads.  Then how our taste flipped and we gratefully deep sixed the cobra heads only to replace them with guess what?  Faithful reproductions of the originals.  

Then I started to think about some of the really wonderful streetlights that I’ve seen in Europe and I wondered have they kept them all along?  If they have how is it that they’re smarter than us?

Maplewood History: Where The Clean Air Is—Maplewood!

By now Bill Jones should need no introduction.  He is very good at supplying me with these short sketches from his experiences here in Maplewood.  I’ve been less good at getting them posted.  I know you’ll enjoy this one titled:

Where The Clean Air Is–Maplewood! In 1934, we moved to Maplewood because mother had a lung condition (indicating possible TB).

Maplewood History: Tales of the Harper’s Pharmacy by Bill Jones

These stories that Mr. Jones has been submitting are priceless.  I’m not sure whether I should refer to him as Bill, Will or Billy but no matter.  His stories let us understand past life in our community that we couldn’t possibly imagine otherwise.  I’m sure you’ll enjoy his latest called:

My Lesson in Growing Up

February 5, 1939–My sister said,  It’s Mr. Harper calling for Billy.”  Mr. Harper asked me, “Will you be twelve tomorrow?

Maplewood History: The Magnificent Cabinetry of the Harper’s Pharmacy Saved!

Now this is a story I’ve been wanting to post for a long time.  Three years anyhow.  Those of you who have been following this blog for that long will recall that is when the magnificent cabinetry of the original Harper’s Pharmacy was removed so the space could be restored. You may also recall how many of us were upset with Mr. John Hickey, director of the local chapter of the Sierra Club because he chose not to have the cabinets returned to the place they had been since their installation in 1926.  We had an almost completely intact interior of an historic pharmacy, a time capsule of our community, miraculously survive until that April of 2014.

Maplewood History: The Paul Revere of Maplewood?

My last post featured a story from 1910 in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that told of a serious yet completely forgotten explosion in Maplewood. It came to light from the furious digging of Maplewood history aficionado, Luke Havel. Commenting on that post, Luke pointed out that there was another very interesting Maplewood related story on the opposite side of that front page. I agreed.

Maplewood History: An Explosive Article Brought to Light by the Research of Luke Havel

Some posts are easier than others. This is one of the easiest of all. For me it is like shooting fish in a barrel even though I can’t imagine why anyone would ever want to do that. For those of you who may be young enough to be unfamiliar with the phrase, like shooting fish in a barrel implies that something is as easy as taking candy from a baby even though I can’t imagine why anyone would do that either. Enough of this.