Stan Masters: A World Class Watercolorist…from Maplewood

The home where Stan Masters lived and painted is within eyesight of my own.  Yet I never met him before he passed away at the end of 2005. With our shared interest in historic buildings and art, we probably would have gotten along very well.

I first learned of Stan early in 2006 when his widow, Carlene called to offer a donation of one of his watercolors to our now defunct historical society.  The one I chose at that time is the same one recently featured in Doug Miner’s article about the gift of the Masters painting to the Maplewood Public Library.

Carlene kindly let me photograph many of Stan’s paintings including all of them with Maplewood buildings as a subject. In an effort to help her find buyers, I included some of her husband’s paintings in the first Let Them Eat Art event held that year in July.

It was while having them framed at The Frame of Mind shop that the art and antique dealer, Robert Morrisey first saw them.  He and Carlene quickly reached an agreement that has since benefited them both a great deal.  Representing Carlene, Mr. Morrisey has expertly marketed Stan’s paintings to folks who recognize value.

Interested parties should read Stan’s Wikipedia page.  They can also see and purchase Stan’s paintings at Clark Graves Antiques in Clayton.

Now here’s a kicker.  Not only was Stan a watercolorist of the first order, he also won first prize in the amateur division at the Cannes Film Festival.  That’s right…a Cannes Film Festival winner from Maplewood!

Robert Morrissey, owner of Clark Graves Antiques in Clayton, with Carlene Masters during a show there of Stan's paintings.

Doug Houser

Robert Morrissey, owner of Clark Graves Antiques in Clayton, with Carlene Masters during a show there of Stan's paintings.

Stan the Man at work in his studio on Flora.

Carlene Masters

Stan the Man at work in his studio on Flora.

This is the colorful, signed version of the buildings at Hazel and Sutton that was recently donated to the Maplewood Public Library.

Doug Houser

This is the colorful, signed version of the buildings at Hazel and Sutton that was recently donated to the Maplewood Public Library.

This equally nice version was never signed.

Doug Houser

This equally nice version was never signed.

Until the Harper family sold the complex of buildings they were painted white.

Maplewood Public Library

Until the Harper family sold the complex of buildings they were painted white.

Stan painted at least three versions of the buildings in white.  There is a bit of camera distortion caused by the less than optimal circumstances when I first photographed these.

Doug Houser

Stan painted at least three versions of the buildings in white. There is a bit of camera distortion caused by the less than optimal circumstances when I first photographed these.

And another.

Doug Houser

And another.

And a third.

Doug Houser

And a third.

Stan also painted at least two versions of the Seris Shop a business many Maplewoodians will remember.

Doug Houser

Stan also painted at least two versions of the Seris Shop, a business many Maplewoodians will remember.

This version suffers from a bit of camera distortion.  I took these photos in a dimly lit bedroom that at the time contained 350+ of Stan's paintings.  I'll post more of Stan's paintings of Maplewood landmarks in my next post.

Doug Houser

This version suffers from a bit of camera distortion. I took these photos in a dimly lit bedroom that at the time contained 350+ of Stan's paintings. I'll include more of Stan's paintings of Maplewood landmarks in my next post.

8 thoughts on “Stan Masters: A World Class Watercolorist…from Maplewood

  1. Terrific article! I completely agree with Doug’s characterization of Stan Masters as a “world class artist”. Working with Carlene and these paintings has been far and away the highlight of my career. I, too, am saddened that I never got to meet him, but we are all beneficiaries of his singular vision and for that we can be grateful.

    I’m thrilled to tell you Stan added another museum to his growing resume: Cedarhurst Center for the Arts in Mt. Vernon, IL bought two watercolors last summer and they are now part of that prestigious museum’s permanent collection. Interestingly, the view of that wonderful building at Hazel and Sutton- the one with the fire hydrant in the photos above- is one of them. (The other is a view of Alton, IL)

  2. I love Stan’s style and would enjoy having an authorized copy of one of these Maplewood shots. I wonder how difficult it is in this day and age to create a small line of lithographs that could be purchased. I am just thinking that there might be a lot people like me who either don’t have the disposable income to buy one of Stan’s actual watercolors or who are most interested in displaying one of the specific Maplewood street scenes. Just a thought.

    • Stan did many scenes of Maplewood and I’m in the process of scanning them to make giclee prints, just as you suggest. Please feel free to contact me about the project. I’m open to anyone’s input. My shop is Clark Graves Antiques. 314.725.2695.

    • Spot on! Hopper was Stan’s favorite artist. He was also influenced by Winslow Homer and Andrew Wyeth.

  3. Thanks, Doug, for bringing to light the art, architecture and history of Maplewood in a wonderful manner. I appreciate your showcasing an excellent artist. I, too, wish I had met him.

  4. Doug
    Did Stan ever do any works of the Mill or Saratoga? I would be very interested. Thanks