Stan Masters: While We’re on the Subject…

In this third and final installment about Stan Masters, Maplewood’s virtuoso watercolorist, I’d like to feature one more painting of a Maplewood scene.  Then I’d like to show the viewers some examples of Stan’s other paintings as well.

The viewers would do well to keep in mind that I originally photographed these paintings with less than ideal lighting.  They are much more impressive when seen in person and that’s easy enough to do. Just visit Clark Graves Antiques in Clayton (132 N. Meramec Avenue) for the fascinating and ever changing display of Mr. Masters’ best works.

An alert art detective in the audience speculates that the location of this scene may be in the rear of the buildings at 7328-44 Manchester.  I also have a photograph of another version of this scene with slight variations but the photo is not clear.

Stan Masters

An alert art detective in the audience speculates that the location of this scene may be in the rear of the buildings at 7328-44 Manchester. I also have a photograph of another version of this scene with slight variations but the photo is not clear.

A stack of Stan's paintings with "Noon Freight" on top.

Doug Houser

A stack of Stan's paintings with "Noon Freight" on top.

An interesting closeup of the turreted building also seen in "Noon Freight".  Stan's notes can be seen in the margins.

Stan Masters

An interesting closeup of the turreted building also seen in "Noon Freight". Stan's notes can be seen in the margins.

Paintings such as this one titled, "Country Auction" have a special appeal.  Deliberately left under construction they reveal a bit about the artist's methods.

Stan Masters

Paintings such as this one titled, "Country Auction" have a special appeal. Deliberately left as if under construction they reveal a bit about the artist's methods.

The Bonne Terre train station well done.

Stan Masters

The Bonne Terre train station well done.

This appealingly decrepit church would look great on your living room wall if it hasn't already been sold.

Stan Masters

This appealingly, weathered church would look great on your living room wall if it hasn't already been sold.

"Old truck at Times Beach.  One thing we can be certain of, the old truck and Times Beach are both gone.

Stan Masters

"Old Truck at Times Beach". One thing we can be certain of, the old truck and Times Beach are both gone.

This rare night time scene demonstrates Stan's mastery of his medium.

Stan Masters

This rare night time scene demonstrates Stan's mastery of his medium.

Stan shifted gears and changed his style a bit to produce this sun dappled image.

Stan Masters

Stan shifted gears and changed his style a bit to produce this sun dappled image.

This one featuring day lilies is a favorite of Carlene's and mine.

Stan Masters

This one featuring day lilies is a favorite of Carlene's and mine.

You'll not find a better setting to view Stan's paintings than the rotating display at Clark Graves Antiques in Clayton.

Doug Houser

You'll not find a better setting to view Stan's paintings than the rotating display at Clark Graves Antiques in Clayton.

11 thoughts on “Stan Masters: While We’re on the Subject…

  1. The first painting in this post depicts a favorite subject of Stan’s: there are at least four versions of this industrial/urban scene. Yes, these buildings are on the south side of Manchester east of Sutton, as seen from the alley. While at first glance we see a rather tough, hardscrabble cityscape, closer inspection reveals Masters’ natural impulse to breathe life into a picture. Note the two pigeons in the left foreground and the one in flight. The wisps of smoke rising from the chimneys suggest activity within each of the buildings, endowing the entire scene with a modest vitality.

  2. Wonderful! The night scene of the fenced in lake could be of the “lake on top of the hill” just north of Manchester in Brentwood–so lovely–

    • Good thought, Phyliss! We’ll have to check that out. Stan’s paintings seem to be fairly faithful to his subjects. Thanks for your comment.

    • You’re right, Phyllis- the painting is called “Brentwood Pond at Night”. Stan painted at least two night versions and several daytime views. As Doug said, he rarely painted night scenes, but when he did he really captured a mood and atmosphere- warm and inviting with a just a touch of mystery.

  3. Another great post, Doug! Many of the watercolors you show are sold, but I have high resolution giclee prints of most of them. AND they’re signed by Carlene Masters, Stan’s widow. “The Keystone Hotel” is in Alton, where I grew up. The last photo in your post shows my shop from 3 years ago- just before the New York exhibit. The top watercolor to the left of the fireplace, the View of Alton, now hangs at Cedarhurst in Mt. Vernon, IL. Stan not only painted numerous scenes of Maplewood, but also of Soulard, Kirkwood, Webster Groves and many surrounding rural areas, including Alton. He was also a brilliant railroad artist!

    • Robert, Thanks for the additional information and thanks for bringing us up to date.

  4. Thank you Doug, I really am enjoying these paintings. And I am going to try to get by Clark Graves to see them in person – if this snow and ice ever ends..
    Some of Stan Masters paintings keep reminding me of other great artists. Are you familiar with the paintings of Andrew Wyeth ? The painting of the that old weathered church is very like many of Wyeth’s
    Tom

    • You’re welcome, Tom. Carlene Masters was just saying that two of Stan’s influences were Andrew Wyeth and Edward Hopper.

  5. Doug, thanks for posting so many of Stan Master’s paintings. He was truly a gifted artist.