Richmond Heights P&Z OK’s new urgent care facility

The Richmond Heights planning and zoning commission on Thursday OK’d a developer’s plan to raze the building on the southwest corner of Clayton and Big Bend for a new urgent care facility — Total Access Urgent Care. The vote was 6-2, city building/zoning commissioner, David Reary said on Friday.

He said the commission understood the feelings of residents who want to let the existing building stand, which houses longtime businesses Waldbart Florist and Jon Paul Designs, but that wasn’t what was before the city. The development required no rezoning; no special use permit for the occupancy. He said the city doesn’t get involved in private contracts or negotiations.

The development will now be an agenda item at a city council meeting, where the city manager will ask the council if they want to call it up. The council would have to vote affirmatively to call it up, it would then be set for a hearing at a later date. If not, planning and zoning’s decision will stand. The next city council meeting is Tuesday, Sept. 5.

A resident reported on the meeting via Twitter:

 

12 thoughts on “Richmond Heights P&Z OK’s new urgent care facility

  1. Let me see if I can get this correct. One of THE highest traffic intersections in the central corridor, within reach of all kinds of walkable amenities and all that can be done on this corner is (another) Urgent Care? Huh? There is no imagination left in Richmond Height’s city government. Don’t get me wrong I think it was time for something new on the intersection, but this… It’s just a terrible wasted opportunity.

  2. Such a loss to the surrounding neighborhood to lose another lovely old building for a characterless replacement. Agree that we can vote with our pocketbooks snd not patronize this redundant urgent care.

  3. How about everyone complaining to urgent care. Tell them if they tear down this beautiful old building they will not visit that Urgent Care. Maybe our pocket books will help.

  4. Good idea, I’m guilty of not attending meetings but I think that need’s to change. We have always gotten our flowers for all occasions at Waldbart & been quite pleased. I’m dismayed by this city & it’s arrogance toward long-time residents. Every mature tree marked for death & replaced with small curb trees. Entire blocks of sun beating down on asphalt streets when mature trees would help improve looks and, most importantly, air quality. So over this politburo.

    • I don’t know how the size of space compares, but they would be great in the newly vacant Live Juke Joint space on the corner of Manchester & Sutton.

  5. @Doug – Could you possibly find out the actual vote from last night? If ‘there was nothing they could do’, how was the vote 6-2? Why is there ever anything except a unanimous vote? I think many of us would like to know the reasoning behind the No votes.

  6. This decision makes no sense at all. Richmond heights is allowing way too many tear downs.

  7. awesome, because we definitely need TWO urgent cares within a few blocks of each other 🙄 Is the current building not up to code or something? Whats the reason to demolish and not renovate?

  8. The proposal mentioned needing okay for one less parking space than required. Was that part of P&Z approval?

    The Shrug emoticon is just about right here. If you care about these types of things, you have to ask your current officials to actually pass ordinances to protect historic buildings, or create special districts. When the next election comes around, ask the questions. Right now, talk to your officials and tell them to start working on plans to protect our community from development like this. A ‘what can we do?’ is not a proper response from an Elected Official. Either they are for these types of zoning decisions or they aren’t.

    • Agree 100% Ian. It’s a problem citizens need to understand. The decision to tear down an awesome building like this is made long before anyone even plans to do it. As long as councils procrastinate and do not address these issues preemptively, the urban fabric that makes up a sustainable community will continue to be chiseled away.