Maplewood History: First There Were Horses

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Horses have been a part of our community from the first time James Sutton rode one here from his blacksmith shop in downtown St. Louis to inspect this wooded tract that he would eventually purchase.  No doubt there were horses ridden through what would one day become Maplewood prior to Sutton’s 1826 purchase.

There are no horses in Maplewood today as far as I know but they were definitely here in the past.  I can prove it.  Here are the photos.

A stock book cover that once belonged to James Sutton.
The cover of a stock book that once belonged to James Sutton.
A page from Sutton's book.
Pages from Sutton’s book. This is probably the earliest record we have concerning horses on Sutton’s farm. His home was located on Manchester about where Dobb’s Tire is today.  I’ll have to admit I don’t know where this book came from.  I scanned the whole thing but I can’t remember who let me do it.  Sorry.
Edward (Ned) Rannells was a neighbor of Sutton's. He was reported to be quite a horseman in a family memoir. he is seen in this photo sitting on the wagon with the reins in his hand. The location is not identified. Woodside, Maplewood's most historic home was built by Ned's father Charles. Ned was probably born there and lived there for much of his life. when he died in 1920, Woodside left the Rannells family.
Edward (Ned) Rannells was a neighbor of Sutton’s. He was reported to be quite a horseman in a family memoir. He is seen in this photo sitting on the wagon with the reins in his hand. The location is not identified. Woodside, Maplewood’s most historic home, was built by Ned’s father Charles. Ned was probably born there and lived there for much of his life. When he died in 1920, Woodside (built ca. 1848) was sold for the first time. Courtesy of the Rannells family.
Cartmell and Warder Rannells, cjildren of Ned and Elinor, seen here with a couple of four legged buddies. the pony is not identified but the dog is probably, Dale, known from the inscription on another family photo. Courtesy of the Rannells family.
Cartmell and Warder Rannells, children of Ned and Elinor, seen here with a couple of four legged buddies. The pony is not identified but the dog may be Dale, known from the inscription on another family photo. Courtesy of the Rannells family.
Rosa and Emil L. Scheidt posing with their handsome rig in front of their first store in the 7200 block of Manchester. Opened in 1907, they moved to the current location at 7320 Manchester in 1916. The boy is Emil C. Scheidt who would grow up to run the hardware store until the operation was taken over by his son, Bob, who is still involved today.
Rosa and Emil L. Scheidt posing with their handsome rig in front of their first store in the 7200 block of Manchester. Opened in 1907, they moved to the current location at 7320 Manchester in 1916. The boy is Emil C. Scheidt who would grow up to run the hardware store until the operation was taken over by his son, Bob.  Bob is in the process of retiring and the ownership of this Maplewood institution is passing to new owners.  I don’t know all of the details on that but I do know that if you go to Scheidt hardware today (and you should) you will meet these very friendly folks.  We are extremely lucky to have this very convenient source for many of our household needs and in its historic building to boot!
an early shot of the Maplewood Laundry once located where citizen's Bank is today. Courtesy of Maplewood Public Library.
An early shot of the Maplewood Laundry once located where Citizen’s Bank is today. Courtesy of Maplewood Public Library.
This could be Dr. Cape's rig with the then Congregational church in the background. the location is Hazel at Sutton. the church still exists. this shot was taken in front of Dr. Cape's home which once stood where we have a parking lot today. Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
This could be Dr. Cape’s rig with the then Congregational church in the background. The location is Hazel at Sutton. The church still exists. This shot was taken in front of Dr. Cape’s home which once stood where we have a parking lot today. Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
Mrs. Dudley of the Maplewood Dairy on Walter with her rig. Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
Mrs. Dudley, of the Maplewood Dairy on Walter, with her rig. Looks to me like she needed to give her horse a few more oats. Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
George quick shown here with the Maplewood Dairy's delivery vehicle. Isn't this just a great photo? Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
George Quick shown here with the Maplewood Dairy’s delivery vehicle. I don’t know where this photo was taken but isn’t this just a great photo? Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
Maplewood's finest pose with their gear and dog in this fine image from 1912. The original building still exists on Sutton. Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
Maplewood’s finest pose with their gear and dog in this fine image from 1912. The original buildings still exist on Sutton. Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
Automobiles were definitely gaining ground by the time this 1916 postcard was printed but the artist included a horse and wagon team as well.
Automobiles were definitely gaining ground by the time this 1916 postcard was printed but the artist included a couple of  horse-and-wagon teams as well. I especially like the way the people and vehicles were miniaturized in order to make the building appear larger. Courtesy of the Maplewood Public Library.
For reader Mark who asked where the Maplewood Dairy was located. From the old familiar 1909 Plat Book of St. Louis County.
For reader Mark who asked where the Maplewood Dairy was located. From the old familiar 1909 Plat Book of St. Louis County.

 

10 COMMENTS

  1. I grew up at 3424 Commonwealth in the house where my father, Bud Gustafson, was born in 1919. In the early 50’s he built a concrete block garage. When he dug the foundation he discovered a brick stable floor. The house was built prior to 1900, probably after that stable was gone. It may have been a stable on the outskirts of a large land parcel. When the property was surveyed for the garage it was discovered that a very small piece of the property was actually in the City of St. Louis. My father had to have that tiny corner annexed to Maplewood. I was a child when this happened but I remember my father saying in later years that the paperwork was under $20 for the process. It would be interesting to know who owned the original parcel of land in the 1800s.

  2. And not all that long ago, we still had two what I believe were horse barns.
    One on Marshal near Maple and another on Sutton, behind the house at the corner of Flora and Sutton.
    And then there is the “Mule Barn” behind Saratoga Lanes.

    • Tom, you are exactly right. I believe the stable behind the Saratoga building should have a plaque on it that reads The Mule Palace. According to Alan Blood that is what the Maplewood Mill workers named it. They were working in a wooden frame building covered with tarpaper located where the parking lot is today. They were apparently jealous that the mules got a brick building. Also I believe that we still have at least two barns. Both are on Oxford. One has been converted into a house and the other more resembles a garage but with a hay door in the gable end. I’m not sure about this second one and will investigate a bit further.

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